Tuesday, May 19, 2020

I have been asked this question many times over the last few weeks. With churches closed and sacraments suspended, what can we do if we need to get to confession? Here is how I answered that question for a young man named Jose.

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JOSE ASKS: What can I do if I’ve fallen into mortal sin and there is no priest around for confession? Steve, it is really important to me.

STEVE RAY HERE: Hello Jose, yes, I understand your situation and distress. Two things you can do:

If you live near a church you can call and make an appointment with the priest for confession. From what I understand, he won’t refuse you. Call and tell him you need to have him hear your confession. He should invite you over, probably with you wearing a mask and keeping within their rules for distancing, but he should hear your confession.

If you are unable to get to a priest, or if for some reason he will not hear your confession, there is a remedy which is explained in the Catechism of the Catholic Church. Read paragraphs 1451 and 1452:

download (1)CONTRITION
No. 1451 Among the penitent’s acts contrition occupies first place. Contrition is “sorrow of the soul and detestation for the sin committed, together with the resolution not to sin again.

No. 1452 When it arises from a love by which God is loved above all else, contrition is called “perfect” (contrition of charity). Such contrition remits venial sins; it also obtains forgiveness of mortal sins if it includes the firm resolution to have recourse to sacramental confession as soon as possible.

So Jose, if you cannot get to confession, confess your sins directly to God with contrition for your sins based on love for God. Then resolve to go to a priest as soon as one is available, and even your mortal sins will be forgiven.

1 John 1:9  “If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.”

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Baptists at the Council of Nicea?

by Steve Ray on May 19, 2020

Written by Fr. Hugh Barbour, O.Praem.

Nicea, August 24, A.D. 325, 7:41 p.m.    “That was powerful preaching, Brother Athanasius. Powerful! Amen! I want to invite any of you folks in the back to approach the altar here and receive the Lord into your hearts. Just come on up. We’ve got brothers and sisters up here who can lead you through the Sinner’s Prayer. Amen! And as this Council of Nicea comes to an end, I want to remind Brother Eusebius to bring the grape juice for tomorrow’s closing communion service . . .”

Ah yes, the Baptists at the Council of Nicea. Sound rather silly? It certainly does. And yet, there are those who claim the Church of Nicea was more Protestant in belief and practice than Catholic. I recently read an article in The Christian Research Journal, written by a Reformed Baptist apologist, who argued this very point.

No, I’m not making this up. The article, “What Really Happened at Nicea?” actually claimed the Fathers of the Council were essentially Evangelical Protestants.

As a trained patristics scholar, I always feel a great deal of sadness and frustration when I encounter shoddy historical “scholarship,” whether it be in the pages of The Watchtower, a digest of Mormon “archaeology,” or a popular and usually well-produced Evangelical Protestant apologetics journal. But this article was so error-laden, so amateurishly “researched,” and so filled with historical and theological fallacies, that I simply couldn’t let it stand without response.”

(Lower two pictures: Left is an icon of St. Athanasius; lower right: the Council of Nicea)

For the full article “‘Ancient Baptists’ and Other Myths” by Fr. Hugh Barbour, O.Praem. – click HERE.

Read more about St. Athansius, the star theologian at the Council of Nicea. Dave Armstrong’s article proves the full Catholic teaching of St.Athansius and the Council of Nicea. Click HERE.

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